Fresh Start

Photo by Joe Grant © 2021

In the dark before dawn, he awoke and went into the wilds to pray.
Simon and his companions sought him out and finding him said,
‘Everyone is looking for you.’

Mark 1:35-37

Seeker,
What are you looking for in this fresh and fragile new year?

On the cusp of a year brand-new,
we wonder what to hold and what to let go;
means and mindsets that need to die, so newness now can grow.

Names and faces in hallowed memoriam held;
losses that will never leave us, lashed to our regret;
lessons we cannot afford to ignore or too quickly forget.

Upon this weathered threshold,
we dare not wish away
a past, now part of us, that brought us to brink of day.

They are what saves the world: who choose to grow
Thin to a starting point beyond this squalor

Mary Oliver, On Winter’s Margin

For we must believe in beginnings,
resist the draw to replicate or retain
previous patterns, expectations and well-practiced distain.

In mind and mode, already things have changed,
hopefully so will we.
For a start to be new and fresh, we really must break free.

Often we embark with committed resolve,
which quickly dissipates and leaves
as we fold back into the familiar that readily deceives.

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make and end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.

T. S. Eliot, Little Gidding

In policy and practicality,
what must we bring to an end,
so we might at least start to make amends?

Will we listen hard to injustice at the root,
reject rampant falsehood, face our fears within
to bravely embrace a wider truth so reconciling might begin?

Will we loose spirited imagination not ours,
to revise, renew and creatively restore
the scoured face of earth, scorched, parched and sore?

Life is not hurrying
on to a receding future, nor hankering after
an imagined past. It is the turning
aside like Moses to the miracle
of the lit bush …

R. S. Thomas

Though we may lack capacity
to realize what begs to be done,
still, can we decide who we each intend to become.

Reshaping community and beyond,
will require of us “good trouble”
to fins a pathway clear through all the smoke and rubble.

So in this dark before dawn
let wild soul searching start
for the Christ we must reclaim when our world is torn apart.

joe

Visit my website: inthestormstill.com
A BOOK BY JOE GRANT

Time to Mend

Photo by Joe Grant © 2020

It is not the healthy who need healing, but those who are ill.
Go and learn this; ‘I desire mercy, not sacrifice.’

Matthew 9:13-13

Seeker
What needs to mend to bring these difficult days to an end?

Now is the time to turn
every effort of mind and spirit
toward mending.

After all, healing starts to happen
the moment the blow is struck;
before bumps swell and bruises blossom.

At lightning speed,
our bodies release
endorphins to soften suffering;

platelets clot
around wounds
to staunch the flow;

cohorts of white cells
converge to consume infectious invaders,
as blisters bathe ruptured cells.

At every level,
our corporeal community
reflexively coordinates a concerted healing response.

No matter the intensity of injury—
though we may be traumatized—
our bodies diligently work for repair.

There is a time to tear and a time to mend.

Ecclesiastes 3:7

Pandemic continually exposes
the essential truth
of our interwoven interdependence.

The entire body of humankind has fallen ill,
stricken by a disease
that contaminates our every “normal” operation.

Masked and gloved,
we dare not risk sharing a moist breath
or clasping a clammy hand,

nor can we coalesce around the frail,
to hug and hold
those who are hurting.

Now we come to appreciate
the necessary loving touches of community
for mental, physical, and moral wellbeing.

Far deeper than a gregarious nature;
it is only by “being with”
that we understand how to be human.

And there is such
sacramental soul force
in the mutuality of communal experience.

Wherever two or three gather in my name,
I am right there among them.

Matthew 18:20

Rapidly-reproducing
miniscule COVID particles
have already transformed life across our globe.

We cannot hope to contain a plague,
that affects hearts and minds as it infects bodies,
without learning its lessons.

Our greatest failure
may be failing to learn;
else this plague will overcome us.

Feigning invincibility
while disregarding great loss of life,
reflects only callous hubris and deadly folly.

It is always the right time to do the right thing

Martin Luther King Jr.

Just as a single cell cannot affect repair,
mending begins with the humble awareness that
it takes more than a village, a city, even the capacity of any nation alone.

It takes all of us,
pooling together
every resource of intellect, energy and will.

Perhaps the blessing of these diseased days
may be our eventual unanimity;
all humankind engaged in a common struggle.

We can build a beautiful city…
We may not reach the ending
But we can start
Slowly but truly mending
Brick by brick
Heart by heart
Now, maybe now
we start learning how.

Stephen Schwartz

Mending means more than developing a cure.
It reaches for universal repair—
reweaving our relationships to life.

Since love is both the ending
and the means
to mending,

may we embrace a new era:
a great convergence of the whole human body,
broken and mercifully blessed with a deep desire to mend.

The greatest challenge of the day is: how to bring about a revolution of the heart, a revolution which has to start with each one of us?

Dorothy Day

joe

Visit my website: inthestormstill.com
A BOOK BY JOE GRANT