Land Listening

Photo by Joe Grant © 2021

Notice the figs and other trees;
as soon as their leaves sprout
you can see for yourselves
that summer comes near.
So, when you see these things taking place,
know too that God’s Realm approaches.

Luke 21: 29-32

Seeker,
What is the land trying to tell you?

Though we might speed
through thin air
and on inflated wheels roll around

still our feet,
sooner or later,
must surely grace holy ground.

Bare your soles,
for this land
on which you stand is sacred.

Exodus 3:5

We might reduce the land
beneath and around us
to a resource, ready to be developed or exploited,

for it is foundation and
source of sustenance,
as well as sheltering living room.

We might perhaps perceive our selves
elevated, beyond earth,
supreme among beings.

And we might even harbor
the delusional grandeur
that timeless terrain is our exclusive domain.

Yet, before the stone-studded yard of graves,
the inevitability of being grounded
finally comes to rest.

For the soil beneath insulated soles
is but crumbled humus of long forgotten lives
that trod the clay before us.

And while we may ignore ground
disdain dirt, take earth for granted,
exhaust and despoil soil,

land has its own voice and,
heeded or not,
always has the last word.

If listening is love and love is listening,
then baring souls to greet the ground
becomes a radical act of adoration.

While we must toil to work the soil,
land needs to work on us,
and train us how to give and live in love.

I used to think the top global problems were
biodiversity loss, ecosystem collapse
and climate change … I was wrong.
The top environmental problems are
selfishness, greed and apathy
and to deal with these we need
a spiritual and cultural transformation.

James Gustave Speth

Whether you realize it or not,
your home is already founded
on holy land, and everywhere,

in urban sprawl, deserted plain,
seashore, wood or mountain,
sacred sanctuary craves your presence.

Neither exiles, orphans, nor accidental tourists,
but pilgrims are we
always sauntering on “Sante Terre” – Holy Ground.

Perspective

Wilderness people
see a garden in waiting,
grace-land not wasteland.

Joe Grant, Scratchings

With the land itself as hermitage,
each leaf and blade of grass
offers a wide welcome home.

And amid a daily information deluge
ageless ground invites immersion
into the deep drift of untamed time.

Wider than heady self-preoccupations,
interiority and conceptual contemplation,
listening to land penetrates us with wild presence.

Here we remember the carbon of our body
was birthed from stardust
Here, with no land left to push us off
of we create Home amongst the stars
Here, shining, whole, and a hundred
unseeable colors
We are a migrant constellation

We are home
We are home

Jess X. Snow

Though we belong to earth,
pervasive alienation reveals that
we have lost our place in the chorus of creation.

So, we listen
not to save Earth
but to be restored and reclaimed by land.

With patient urgency earth aches
for us to end this self-imposed
exile from sacred soil.

So, as you listen to the land
may earth also listen through you
till you receive and share Ceud Mìle Fàilte
–a hundred thousand welcomes-home!

joe

Visit my website: inthestormstill.com
A BOOK BY JOE GRANT

COMING SOON

Scratchings, Poems & More

by Joe Grant

Let in De-Light

Photo by Joe Grant © 2021

[A version of this reflection was first posted in 2016]

If the light within you is darkness, how great is that darkness!

Matthew 6:23

Seeker,
What sights have you taken in today?

Looking back to childhood,
I am struck
by how often we had our windows cleaned.

Every other week,
with ladder, bucket and cloth,
a window-cleaner appeared.

After a splash and squeaky wipe,
crystal clarity
brought into sharper focus beauty and blight.

If the doors of perception were cleansed
all would appear as it is, infinite.

William Blake

With each passing moment
countless images flicker
before ever-hungry eyes.

Such a volume of visual stimulation
illuminates optic nerves
and fires frenzied neurons in our brains.

Cascading thoughts,
ideas, visions, sensations
course through our pulsing center.

Picture the graphic noise
that illustrates
the news of just one day:

moving messages and retinal flashes,
tinted by culture, colored by ideology,
perspective refracted through passion and pain.

What today have you seen or selected,
overlooked or filtered,
blindly blocked or deftly deflected?

No eye has yet seen, nor ear heard, nor heart conceived,
what the Holy One has is store for those who love.

1 Corinthians 2:9

Whether clouded by confusion,
fogged by anger, steamed with passion,
smudged by cynicism,

or made dusty with distraction;
the opaque lens of the soul
requires regular wiping,

so we might cut through clutter to clarity,
and welcome what life presents
with the fresh bright eyes of a child.

We don’t see things as THEY are.
We see things as WE are.

Talmud

If you are intent on neighbor-keeping,
with a head for justice and a tender heart,
it helps each day to cleanse the lens.

Nor dare we disregard darkness,
or close our lids to problem and pain,
but rather rinse insight in mercy’s rain.

When the world looks only grimy,
when hope and possibility are obscured,
that’s the time for window-wiping, to let in delight.

Clean the pains with wonder and lament,
for the tears of sorrow and laughter you share,
let in delight to dissipate despair.

Create in me a wiped-clean heart,
and place within a fresh and steady spirit.

Psalm 51:10

No matter where your eyes come to rest,
may you look long and lovingly,
till delight breaks in and brightens.

joe

Visit my website: inthestormstill.com
A BOOK BY JOE GRANT

Coming Soon!

SCRATCHINGS: Poems & More by Joe Grant


Good Grief

Photo by Joe Grant © 2021

While they were deep in discussion,
Jesus approached incognito and went along with them.
‘What are you talking about?’ he asked.
They stood there, distressed.

Luke 24: 15-17

Seeker,
During these difficult days, what deep concerns do you carry?

When bereft,
we need others to help find our bearings,
for burdens shared are halved.

And good grief work,
a communion of sorrow and sadness,
unearths hard-won wisdom.

But first we must grieve
what is lost,
acknowledge what is broken

so that in the morning of mourning
hearts and lives can crack
and poured-out pain becomes love.

Unless we transfigure pain, we transmit it.

Richard Rohr

Each loss breaks to remake us
within this lovely shadow
where Holy One abides.

Thus, healing starts
with the humble admission,
of a heart’s desire for wholeness.

And deep transformation goes mostly unseen
till unexpected life resurges,
changed and still familiar.

This grief leads to goodness;
the salve in salvation, the return of redemption,
the resurgence called resurrection.

Grieving together readies
the road to resurrection,
proposing no escape from trial or tears,

but promising a wide-wounded welcome,
in solidarity with tangible sufferings
and alienations all.

What would you harvest from heartache and pain
if you understood loss as a way to regain
the never-forsaken terrain of belonging?

Bernadette Miller

As we listen to uprisings
whispered in the
winds of change,

and attend
to sighs of loss, cries of pain
that blow through us and around,

clouded eyes clarify to gaze afresh
at living lessons in abundant display
in the school of Creation.

First, foremost,
and to the last,
gardeners all are we.

Relentless Rotation

Downfall to uprise;
seasonal revolution
that recycles life.

Joe Grant

Can you hear
the springtime song
of revolution?

Season of lightening days,
of preparing for planting,
of overturning land and exposing underlay,

of soil softening with showers,
of furrowing ground
for sowing and growing,

spring is hard to ignore.
Hopelessly distracted, sterile souls struggle
to remain impervious to its salacious allures.

As migrants wing
their way
on warmer winds,

milder nights begin to buzz
with the chirping meditations
of an insect chorus,

soon to be decorated with
luminous flickers
of dancing fireflies looking for love.

In our own way
we cooperate with
this irrepressible springtime arrival

that breaks through
pained separation
to welcome us back

into wider wellbeing and broader belonging;
transforming isolation
into wild, wonderful congregation.

Pressed and squeezed out of loss
this balm for heart and eye
has powerful transformative properties.

Christ has no body but yours,
No hands, no feet on earth but yours,
Yours are the eyes with which he looks
Compassion on this world.

Teresa of Ávila

Resurrection requires
wide-eyed attention
and openhearted intention

to un-blinker vision,
unmask smiles,
dismantle fences from minds,

so newness can re-baptize us
with its penetrating
look of love.

We need not look far for resurrection.
Ultimately it depends on
what we are looking for and where we search.

Grieving grace ever abounds
as the wounded, holey Christ
hangs everywhere around.

joe

Visit my website: inthestormstill.com
A BOOK BY JOE GRANT